Finite Element Method in Modeling of Ship Structures. Part II – Practical Analysis Example

Authors

  • D. Doan Uniwersytet Morski w Gdyni, Morska 81-87, 81–225 Gdynia, Wydział Mechaniczny, Katedra Podstaw Techniki
  • A. Szeleziński Uniwersytet Morski w Gdyni, Morska 81-87, 81–225 Gdynia, Wydział Mechaniczny, Katedra Podstaw Techniki
  • L. Murawski Uniwersytet Morski w Gdyni, Morska 81-87, 81–225 Gdynia, Wydział Mechaniczny, Katedra Podstaw Techniki
  • A. Muc Uniwersytet Morski w Gdyni, Morska 81-87, 81–225 Gdynia, Wydział Elektryczny, Katedra Automatyki Okrętowej

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.26408/105.02

Keywords:

numerical methods, Finite Element Method, ship structure strength, ship structure vibrations, modeling methods

Abstract

art I of this paper presents basic knowledge about Finite Element Method including the modeling method of ship structures. Numerical modeling methods were also shortly described. A ship hull and the upper works are typical thin-walled structures. Modeling method of plates (typical 2-D elements) with stiffeners (1-D elements) is presented in details. In the part II of the article, practical example of Ro-Ro ship's deck analyses was performed using Patran-Nastran software (MSC Software). The most common and dangerous risks and errors occurring in the process of ship structure modeling were discussed.

References

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Published

2018-08-31

How to Cite

Doan, D., Szeleziński, A., Murawski, L., & Muc, A. (2018). Finite Element Method in Modeling of Ship Structures. Part II – Practical Analysis Example. Scientific Journal of Gdynia Maritime University, (105), 19–31. https://doi.org/10.26408/105.02

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Articles